When Should You Suspect Thyroid Cancer?

How does thyroid cancer make you feel?

About thyroid cancer The most common symptom of cancer of the thyroid is a painless lump or swelling that develops in the neck.

Other symptoms only tend to occur after the condition has reached an advanced stage, and may include: unexplained hoarseness that lasts for more than a few weeks..

Who is most likely to get thyroid cancer?

For unclear reasons thyroid cancers (like almost all diseases of the thyroid) occur about 3 times more often in women than in men. Thyroid cancer can occur at any age, but the risk peaks earlier for women (who are most often in their 40s or 50s when diagnosed) than for men (who are usually in their 60s or 70s).

How do you detect thyroid cancer?

The actual diagnosis of thyroid cancer is made with a biopsy, in which cells from the suspicious area are removed and looked at in the lab. If your doctor thinks a biopsy is needed, the simplest way to find out if a thyroid lump or nodule is cancerous is with a fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the thyroid nodule.

What blood tests detect thyroid cancer?

Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)—this is a blood test that evaluates thyroid function. It measures TSH levels released by the pituitary gland. TSH is used to evaluate other conditions that may cause signs and symptoms similar to thyroid cancer.

Can you have thyroid cancer and not know it?

Thyroid cancer typically doesn’t cause any signs or symptoms early in the disease. As thyroid cancer grows, it may cause: A lump (nodule) that can be felt through the skin on your neck. Changes to your voice, including increasing hoarseness.

Will thyroid cancer show up on CT scan?

CT Scan. Computed tomography, commonly called a CT scan or CAT scan, uses special X-rays to give your doctor a look inside of your body. It can show the size and location of thyroid cancer and whether it has spread to other parts of your body.