How Is The Holderness Coast Managed?

What causes coastal retreat?

Coastal erosion may be caused by hydraulic action, abrasion, impact and corrosion by wind and water, and other forces, natural or unnatural.

The softer areas fill up with sediment eroded from hard areas, and rock formations are eroded away..

What is terminal groyne syndrome?

Terminal Groyne Syndrome: This is where the last groyne prevents long shore drift from bringing material to other areas along the coast, therefore moving the problem down the coat.

Are groynes hard engineering?

Examples of hard engineering include: Groynes – Low walls constructed at right angles to retain sediments that might otherwise be removed due to longshore drift. These structures absorb or reduce the energy of the waves and cause materials to be deposited on the updrift side of the groyne facing the longshore drift.

How has coastal change affected people on Holderness Coast?

On average, the coastline of Holderness erodes at about 2m per year, mainly during storms and tidal surges. The impacts of coastal erosion on socio-economic aspects are: damage and loss of infrastructures, loss of property, loss of farmland, danger for tourism, damage to coastal protection.

How is mappleton protected?

The two rock groynes at Mappleton have helped develop wide and steep sandy beaches. In 1991 almost £2 million was spent on two rock groynes and a rock revetment to protect Mappleton and the B1242 coastal road. Blocks of granite were imported from Norway for the sea defences.

Why are coasts important 6 Reasons?

Coasts are important to tourism because tourism is important to a country. A tropical country surrounded by water for example would use its coasts to attract tourists. Using coasts as tour spots provides a huge boost for the country’s economy and makes the most of the natural resources that a coast can provide.

Why does the Holderness coast need protecting?

There are several reasons why the coast at Holderness is eroding so quickly: Rock type – the cliffs are made from less-resistant boulder clay (made from sands and clays) which slumps when wet. Naturally narrow beaches – these beaches give less protection to the coast as it doesn’t reduce the power of the waves.

What is happening at the Holderness coast?

What causes the Holderness coastline to retreat? The problem is caused by: strong prevailing winds creating longshore drift that moves material south along the coastline. the cliffs which are made of a soft boulder clay, and will therefore erode quickly, especially when saturated.

What is Holderness coast famous for?

The Holderness Coastline is in the North of England and runs between the Humber Estuary in the south and a headland at Flamborough head. It has the unenviable reputation as the number one place in Europe for coastal erosion, and in a stormy year waves from the North sea can remove between 7 and 10m of coastline.

What are the impacts of coastal erosion?

As global sea level rises, the action of waves at higher elevations increases the likelihood for extensive coastal erosion. Already, coastal erosion costs roughly $500 million per year for coastal property loss, including damage to structures and loss of land.

Why is the Holderness coast so vulnerable to erosion?

The Holderness coastline is susceptible to erosion due to the long north-easterly fetch, allowing for powerful waves, and the softness of the geology that make up the cliffs.

How much do groynes cost?

Artificial reefs are estimated cost around EUR 15,000 to 35,000 per running meter of structure (Deltares, 2014). According to Scottish Natural Heritage, in 2000 construction costs for rock groynes ranged between GBP 10,000 and 100,000£ (12,500 – 125,000€) per structure.

What rock is Flamborough Head made from?

Flamborough Head, is a chalk headland which is topped with till, a glacial deposit left behind during the “Devensian Glacial Period”. The difference in rock types which is made up of Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks such as clays and limestone. These are responsible for the diverse landforms that exist on the coastline.

Why does mappleton need protecting?

In 1990, Mappleton was under threat from losing 30 houses and its main road. In 1991, sea defences were built in order to protect the village and B1242 main road from intense sea erosion. … In order to protect the cliffs along the front of Mappleton from undercutting, their gradient was also reduced artificially.

Which is harder chalk or boulder clay?

Boulder clay is structurally weak, and has little resistance to erosion. It produces sloping cliffs between 5 and 20metre high. Chalk surrounds the boulder clay. This is a much stronger rock but has eroded along fault lines and bedding planes forming structures like cliffs, caves, arches and stacks.

Why is hornsea protected?

Hornsea (destructive waves breach defences) In Hornsea sand has accumulated where protection exists. This is because the groynes provide a barrier to sediment transportation. This has reduced erosion along the front of the town but increased rates are evident further south where the defences stop.

How do groynes protect the coast?

Groynes were originally installed along the coastline in 1915. Groynes control beach material and prevent undermining of the promenade seawall. Groynes interrupt wave action and protect the beach from being washed away by longshore drift. Longshore drift is the wave action that slowly erodes the beach.

What is the difference between hard and soft engineering?

Soft engineering defines natural defences, typically considered inexpensive, long term and sustainable, whereas hard engineering represents artificial structures which are arguably short term, expensive and unsustainable solutions to coastal erosion.